cecy

the-gasoline-station:

Arrow Studio
Architects: PHTR Architects
Location/Year: Tylden, Victoria, Australia / 2013
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
the-gasoline-station:

Arrow Studio
Architects: PHTR Architects
Location/Year: Tylden, Victoria, Australia / 2013
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
the-gasoline-station:

Arrow Studio
Architects: PHTR Architects
Location/Year: Tylden, Victoria, Australia / 2013
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
the-gasoline-station:

Arrow Studio
Architects: PHTR Architects
Location/Year: Tylden, Victoria, Australia / 2013
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
the-gasoline-station:

Arrow Studio
Architects: PHTR Architects
Location/Year: Tylden, Victoria, Australia / 2013
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
the-gasoline-station:

Arrow Studio
Architects: PHTR Architects
Location/Year: Tylden, Victoria, Australia / 2013
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
the-gasoline-station:

Arrow Studio
Architects: PHTR Architects
Location/Year: Tylden, Victoria, Australia / 2013
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
the-gasoline-station:

Arrow Studio
Architects: PHTR Architects
Location/Year: Tylden, Victoria, Australia / 2013
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.
the-gasoline-station:

Arrow Studio
Architects: PHTR Architects
Location/Year: Tylden, Victoria, Australia / 2013
Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed
A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).
The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).
The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.
The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.

the-gasoline-station:

Arrow Studio

Architects: PHTR Architects

Location/Year: Tylden, Victoria, Australia / 2013

Photographed by Sam Reed and Toby Reed

A few years ago our client, Mr White, retired to Tylden in the countryside near Hanging Rock. Our brief was to build a small gallery in the back yard, facing the bush, where he could hang his late wife’s paintings. The gallery would also be used as a study/studio. For security reasons, as well as to maximize hanging space, we were asked to have minimal windows, and for those windows to be framed in a way that intruders could not break in. This became the generator of the shape, which hides the windows behind the screened areas at each end (arrow head, or rotated gables, as the builders referred to them).

The budget, not much more than an off-the-shelf garden shed with slab, was of prime importance, and could not be exceeded. All walls are plywood, which braces the structure and replaces plasterboard on the inside. The galvanised sheets overlapped diagonally form a second skin which helps insulate and protects the ply from the harsh conditions. The roof is an off-the-shelf, all-in-one insulated roofing system (incorporating roofing, insulation and ceiling).

The space between the gallery and the house (an old brick veneer) has become a protected outdoor entertaining area, while on the other side the gallery forms a backdrop for BBQs with a bush setting. At night the room acts as a giant lantern, illuminating the bush garden.

The project was an excuse to do a variation on the modern white cube so often associated with the gallery space. We were also interested in rethinking the Australian steel clad country shed.


cross-connect:

Artist on tumblr - Ricardo Bouyett is a 21-year-old photographer from Chicago, Illinois.

I derive inspiration from life, and I don’t mean that in an avant-garde romantic way at all. I mean that I play witness to many different forms of art and expression that I feel compelled to pay tribute to these varying beauties by creating portraits that communicate identity, love, loss, and life. I tend to rely a lot on music, dance, and poetry  
via interwiev for lostfreedommagazine.com

                                     :-)
cross-connect:

Artist on tumblr - Ricardo Bouyett is a 21-year-old photographer from Chicago, Illinois.

I derive inspiration from life, and I don’t mean that in an avant-garde romantic way at all. I mean that I play witness to many different forms of art and expression that I feel compelled to pay tribute to these varying beauties by creating portraits that communicate identity, love, loss, and life. I tend to rely a lot on music, dance, and poetry  
via interwiev for lostfreedommagazine.com

                                     :-)
cross-connect:

Artist on tumblr - Ricardo Bouyett is a 21-year-old photographer from Chicago, Illinois.

I derive inspiration from life, and I don’t mean that in an avant-garde romantic way at all. I mean that I play witness to many different forms of art and expression that I feel compelled to pay tribute to these varying beauties by creating portraits that communicate identity, love, loss, and life. I tend to rely a lot on music, dance, and poetry  
via interwiev for lostfreedommagazine.com

                                     :-)
cross-connect:

Artist on tumblr - Ricardo Bouyett is a 21-year-old photographer from Chicago, Illinois.

I derive inspiration from life, and I don’t mean that in an avant-garde romantic way at all. I mean that I play witness to many different forms of art and expression that I feel compelled to pay tribute to these varying beauties by creating portraits that communicate identity, love, loss, and life. I tend to rely a lot on music, dance, and poetry  
via interwiev for lostfreedommagazine.com

                                     :-)
cross-connect:

Artist on tumblr - Ricardo Bouyett is a 21-year-old photographer from Chicago, Illinois.

I derive inspiration from life, and I don’t mean that in an avant-garde romantic way at all. I mean that I play witness to many different forms of art and expression that I feel compelled to pay tribute to these varying beauties by creating portraits that communicate identity, love, loss, and life. I tend to rely a lot on music, dance, and poetry  
via interwiev for lostfreedommagazine.com

                                     :-)
cross-connect:

Artist on tumblr - Ricardo Bouyett is a 21-year-old photographer from Chicago, Illinois.

I derive inspiration from life, and I don’t mean that in an avant-garde romantic way at all. I mean that I play witness to many different forms of art and expression that I feel compelled to pay tribute to these varying beauties by creating portraits that communicate identity, love, loss, and life. I tend to rely a lot on music, dance, and poetry  
via interwiev for lostfreedommagazine.com

                                     :-)
cross-connect:

Artist on tumblr - Ricardo Bouyett is a 21-year-old photographer from Chicago, Illinois.

I derive inspiration from life, and I don’t mean that in an avant-garde romantic way at all. I mean that I play witness to many different forms of art and expression that I feel compelled to pay tribute to these varying beauties by creating portraits that communicate identity, love, loss, and life. I tend to rely a lot on music, dance, and poetry  
via interwiev for lostfreedommagazine.com

                                     :-)
cross-connect:

Artist on tumblr - Ricardo Bouyett is a 21-year-old photographer from Chicago, Illinois.

I derive inspiration from life, and I don’t mean that in an avant-garde romantic way at all. I mean that I play witness to many different forms of art and expression that I feel compelled to pay tribute to these varying beauties by creating portraits that communicate identity, love, loss, and life. I tend to rely a lot on music, dance, and poetry  
via interwiev for lostfreedommagazine.com

                                     :-)

cross-connect:

Artist on tumblr - Ricardo Bouyett is a 21-year-old photographer from Chicago, Illinois.

I derive inspiration from life, and I don’t mean that in an avant-garde romantic way at all. I mean that I play witness to many different forms of art and expression that I feel compelled to pay tribute to these varying beauties by creating portraits that communicate identity, love, loss, and life. I tend to rely a lot on music, dance, and poetry 

via interwiev for lostfreedommagazine.com

                                     :-)


cross-connect:

Matt W. Moore is the artist behind MWM Graphics, a design, fine art, and illustration studio. By combining his background in graffiti with graphic design, Moore has created a distinctly bold, colorful, and geometric aesthetic.
While he may be most recognized for his angular, geometric spray-painted murals, he is an innovative artist, combining and working in many mediums. Clients of his include Coca-Cola, Wired Magazine, and Ray-Ban.
He travels and creates art in cities from Paris to Sao Paulo. Working across the globe fuels his creativity, as he responds to the different environments in which he works. Moore’s portfolio is enormous and varied and constantly growing. He perpetually creates beautiful and new work at an extraordinary pace.
                                           :-)
cross-connect:

Matt W. Moore is the artist behind MWM Graphics, a design, fine art, and illustration studio. By combining his background in graffiti with graphic design, Moore has created a distinctly bold, colorful, and geometric aesthetic.
While he may be most recognized for his angular, geometric spray-painted murals, he is an innovative artist, combining and working in many mediums. Clients of his include Coca-Cola, Wired Magazine, and Ray-Ban.
He travels and creates art in cities from Paris to Sao Paulo. Working across the globe fuels his creativity, as he responds to the different environments in which he works. Moore’s portfolio is enormous and varied and constantly growing. He perpetually creates beautiful and new work at an extraordinary pace.
                                           :-)
cross-connect:

Matt W. Moore is the artist behind MWM Graphics, a design, fine art, and illustration studio. By combining his background in graffiti with graphic design, Moore has created a distinctly bold, colorful, and geometric aesthetic.
While he may be most recognized for his angular, geometric spray-painted murals, he is an innovative artist, combining and working in many mediums. Clients of his include Coca-Cola, Wired Magazine, and Ray-Ban.
He travels and creates art in cities from Paris to Sao Paulo. Working across the globe fuels his creativity, as he responds to the different environments in which he works. Moore’s portfolio is enormous and varied and constantly growing. He perpetually creates beautiful and new work at an extraordinary pace.
                                           :-)
cross-connect:

Matt W. Moore is the artist behind MWM Graphics, a design, fine art, and illustration studio. By combining his background in graffiti with graphic design, Moore has created a distinctly bold, colorful, and geometric aesthetic.
While he may be most recognized for his angular, geometric spray-painted murals, he is an innovative artist, combining and working in many mediums. Clients of his include Coca-Cola, Wired Magazine, and Ray-Ban.
He travels and creates art in cities from Paris to Sao Paulo. Working across the globe fuels his creativity, as he responds to the different environments in which he works. Moore’s portfolio is enormous and varied and constantly growing. He perpetually creates beautiful and new work at an extraordinary pace.
                                           :-)
cross-connect:

Matt W. Moore is the artist behind MWM Graphics, a design, fine art, and illustration studio. By combining his background in graffiti with graphic design, Moore has created a distinctly bold, colorful, and geometric aesthetic.
While he may be most recognized for his angular, geometric spray-painted murals, he is an innovative artist, combining and working in many mediums. Clients of his include Coca-Cola, Wired Magazine, and Ray-Ban.
He travels and creates art in cities from Paris to Sao Paulo. Working across the globe fuels his creativity, as he responds to the different environments in which he works. Moore’s portfolio is enormous and varied and constantly growing. He perpetually creates beautiful and new work at an extraordinary pace.
                                           :-)
cross-connect:

Matt W. Moore is the artist behind MWM Graphics, a design, fine art, and illustration studio. By combining his background in graffiti with graphic design, Moore has created a distinctly bold, colorful, and geometric aesthetic.
While he may be most recognized for his angular, geometric spray-painted murals, he is an innovative artist, combining and working in many mediums. Clients of his include Coca-Cola, Wired Magazine, and Ray-Ban.
He travels and creates art in cities from Paris to Sao Paulo. Working across the globe fuels his creativity, as he responds to the different environments in which he works. Moore’s portfolio is enormous and varied and constantly growing. He perpetually creates beautiful and new work at an extraordinary pace.
                                           :-)
cross-connect:

Matt W. Moore is the artist behind MWM Graphics, a design, fine art, and illustration studio. By combining his background in graffiti with graphic design, Moore has created a distinctly bold, colorful, and geometric aesthetic.
While he may be most recognized for his angular, geometric spray-painted murals, he is an innovative artist, combining and working in many mediums. Clients of his include Coca-Cola, Wired Magazine, and Ray-Ban.
He travels and creates art in cities from Paris to Sao Paulo. Working across the globe fuels his creativity, as he responds to the different environments in which he works. Moore’s portfolio is enormous and varied and constantly growing. He perpetually creates beautiful and new work at an extraordinary pace.
                                           :-)
cross-connect:

Matt W. Moore is the artist behind MWM Graphics, a design, fine art, and illustration studio. By combining his background in graffiti with graphic design, Moore has created a distinctly bold, colorful, and geometric aesthetic.
While he may be most recognized for his angular, geometric spray-painted murals, he is an innovative artist, combining and working in many mediums. Clients of his include Coca-Cola, Wired Magazine, and Ray-Ban.
He travels and creates art in cities from Paris to Sao Paulo. Working across the globe fuels his creativity, as he responds to the different environments in which he works. Moore’s portfolio is enormous and varied and constantly growing. He perpetually creates beautiful and new work at an extraordinary pace.
                                           :-)
cross-connect:

Matt W. Moore is the artist behind MWM Graphics, a design, fine art, and illustration studio. By combining his background in graffiti with graphic design, Moore has created a distinctly bold, colorful, and geometric aesthetic.
While he may be most recognized for his angular, geometric spray-painted murals, he is an innovative artist, combining and working in many mediums. Clients of his include Coca-Cola, Wired Magazine, and Ray-Ban.
He travels and creates art in cities from Paris to Sao Paulo. Working across the globe fuels his creativity, as he responds to the different environments in which he works. Moore’s portfolio is enormous and varied and constantly growing. He perpetually creates beautiful and new work at an extraordinary pace.
                                           :-)

cross-connect:

Matt W. Moore is the artist behind MWM Graphics, a design, fine art, and illustration studio. By combining his background in graffiti with graphic design, Moore has created a distinctly bold, colorful, and geometric aesthetic.

While he may be most recognized for his angular, geometric spray-painted murals, he is an innovative artist, combining and working in many mediums. Clients of his include Coca-Cola, Wired Magazine, and Ray-Ban.

He travels and creates art in cities from Paris to Sao Paulo. Working across the globe fuels his creativity, as he responds to the different environments in which he works. Moore’s portfolio is enormous and varied and constantly growing. He perpetually creates beautiful and new work at an extraordinary pace.

                                           :-)


7knotwind:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.
He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”
Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
7knotwind:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.
He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”
Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
7knotwind:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.
He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”
Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
7knotwind:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.
He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”
Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
7knotwind:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.
He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”
Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
7knotwind:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.
He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”
Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
7knotwind:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.
He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”
Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
7knotwind:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.
He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”
Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
7knotwind:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.
He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”
Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]
7knotwind:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.
He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”
Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.
[via Colossal and iGNANT]

7knotwind:

Turkish multimedia artist Erdal Inci experiments with cloned motion in video to create awesomely hypnotic looping videos and gifs of himself moving through public spaces, sometimes carrying lights or other objects. Depending on the exposure, Inci sometimes appears to be no more than a shadow or isn’t visible at all, making his videos even more mysterious and dreamlike.

He states: “I realized that if you clone a recorded performance contiguously it will become perpetual. So that you can see all the time phases of the same performance in a small amount of time like 1 or 2 seconds. This gives you the chance of thinking like a choreographer with a mass crew or painter who fills its frame not in forms and colour but motion. At this point I could tell I am inspired by patterns in traditional arts & crafts , dance and repetition. Motion, performance and real environments are the outlines of the work.”

Check out more of Erdal Inci’s mesmerizing video art (and at much higher resolution) over on Vimeo, Facebook or Instagram.

[via Colossal and iGNANT]

(Fuente: archiemcphee)


cross-connect:

The Paper Art and Sculpture of
Suhail Shaikh ( Paper my Wishes )
“Paper came to me when I was very little and began revealing itself to me slowly, subtly encouraging me to explore, adapting itself faithfully to my changing moods and growing pains,” says Suhail Shaikh in his Paper My Wishes blog. “Today I’m on an adventure of discovery, full of exciting experiments. In this unexpected and pleasant journey I meet people, see places and witness events that enrich my perception and keep the ideas flowing.”
“The overly careless way in which paper is used today is symbolic of our perception of this fine, noble and versatile material,” he continues. “In today’s world of sensorial and sensational overload, the art of subtle refinement is fading away.” txt
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cross-connect:

The Paper Art and Sculpture of
Suhail Shaikh ( Paper my Wishes )
“Paper came to me when I was very little and began revealing itself to me slowly, subtly encouraging me to explore, adapting itself faithfully to my changing moods and growing pains,” says Suhail Shaikh in his Paper My Wishes blog. “Today I’m on an adventure of discovery, full of exciting experiments. In this unexpected and pleasant journey I meet people, see places and witness events that enrich my perception and keep the ideas flowing.”
“The overly careless way in which paper is used today is symbolic of our perception of this fine, noble and versatile material,” he continues. “In today’s world of sensorial and sensational overload, the art of subtle refinement is fading away.” txt
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cross-connect:

The Paper Art and Sculpture of
Suhail Shaikh ( Paper my Wishes )
“Paper came to me when I was very little and began revealing itself to me slowly, subtly encouraging me to explore, adapting itself faithfully to my changing moods and growing pains,” says Suhail Shaikh in his Paper My Wishes blog. “Today I’m on an adventure of discovery, full of exciting experiments. In this unexpected and pleasant journey I meet people, see places and witness events that enrich my perception and keep the ideas flowing.”
“The overly careless way in which paper is used today is symbolic of our perception of this fine, noble and versatile material,” he continues. “In today’s world of sensorial and sensational overload, the art of subtle refinement is fading away.” txt
                                                        &
cross-connect:

The Paper Art and Sculpture of
Suhail Shaikh ( Paper my Wishes )
“Paper came to me when I was very little and began revealing itself to me slowly, subtly encouraging me to explore, adapting itself faithfully to my changing moods and growing pains,” says Suhail Shaikh in his Paper My Wishes blog. “Today I’m on an adventure of discovery, full of exciting experiments. In this unexpected and pleasant journey I meet people, see places and witness events that enrich my perception and keep the ideas flowing.”
“The overly careless way in which paper is used today is symbolic of our perception of this fine, noble and versatile material,” he continues. “In today’s world of sensorial and sensational overload, the art of subtle refinement is fading away.” txt
                                                        &
cross-connect:

The Paper Art and Sculpture of
Suhail Shaikh ( Paper my Wishes )
“Paper came to me when I was very little and began revealing itself to me slowly, subtly encouraging me to explore, adapting itself faithfully to my changing moods and growing pains,” says Suhail Shaikh in his Paper My Wishes blog. “Today I’m on an adventure of discovery, full of exciting experiments. In this unexpected and pleasant journey I meet people, see places and witness events that enrich my perception and keep the ideas flowing.”
“The overly careless way in which paper is used today is symbolic of our perception of this fine, noble and versatile material,” he continues. “In today’s world of sensorial and sensational overload, the art of subtle refinement is fading away.” txt
                                                        &
cross-connect:

The Paper Art and Sculpture of
Suhail Shaikh ( Paper my Wishes )
“Paper came to me when I was very little and began revealing itself to me slowly, subtly encouraging me to explore, adapting itself faithfully to my changing moods and growing pains,” says Suhail Shaikh in his Paper My Wishes blog. “Today I’m on an adventure of discovery, full of exciting experiments. In this unexpected and pleasant journey I meet people, see places and witness events that enrich my perception and keep the ideas flowing.”
“The overly careless way in which paper is used today is symbolic of our perception of this fine, noble and versatile material,” he continues. “In today’s world of sensorial and sensational overload, the art of subtle refinement is fading away.” txt
                                                        &
cross-connect:

The Paper Art and Sculpture of
Suhail Shaikh ( Paper my Wishes )
“Paper came to me when I was very little and began revealing itself to me slowly, subtly encouraging me to explore, adapting itself faithfully to my changing moods and growing pains,” says Suhail Shaikh in his Paper My Wishes blog. “Today I’m on an adventure of discovery, full of exciting experiments. In this unexpected and pleasant journey I meet people, see places and witness events that enrich my perception and keep the ideas flowing.”
“The overly careless way in which paper is used today is symbolic of our perception of this fine, noble and versatile material,” he continues. “In today’s world of sensorial and sensational overload, the art of subtle refinement is fading away.” txt
                                                        &
cross-connect:

The Paper Art and Sculpture of
Suhail Shaikh ( Paper my Wishes )
“Paper came to me when I was very little and began revealing itself to me slowly, subtly encouraging me to explore, adapting itself faithfully to my changing moods and growing pains,” says Suhail Shaikh in his Paper My Wishes blog. “Today I’m on an adventure of discovery, full of exciting experiments. In this unexpected and pleasant journey I meet people, see places and witness events that enrich my perception and keep the ideas flowing.”
“The overly careless way in which paper is used today is symbolic of our perception of this fine, noble and versatile material,” he continues. “In today’s world of sensorial and sensational overload, the art of subtle refinement is fading away.” txt
                                                        &

cross-connect:

The Paper Art and Sculpture of

Suhail Shaikh ( Paper my Wishes )

“Paper came to me when I was very little and began revealing itself to me slowly, subtly encouraging me to explore, adapting itself faithfully to my changing moods and growing pains,” says Suhail Shaikh in his Paper My Wishes blog. “Today I’m on an adventure of discovery, full of exciting experiments. In this unexpected and pleasant journey I meet people, see places and witness events that enrich my perception and keep the ideas flowing.”

“The overly careless way in which paper is used today is symbolic of our perception of this fine, noble and versatile material,” he continues. “In today’s world of sensorial and sensational overload, the art of subtle refinement is fading away.” txt

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